Monthly Archives: April 2017

Vibracore extraction tripod engineering drawings — Vibracore system

For our research in China, I was charged with building a Vibracore system. The Vibracore works by utilizing a concrete vibrator to rapidly vibrate an upright thin-walled aluminium pipe into the sand/dirt/mud below. A tripod is then set up over the in-ground pipe to pull it up from the ground. The pipe (now called a core I suppose…) is then cut open with a saw and analyzed/sampled.

dimetric view of assembled tripod

This system is nothing we invented, although I’m not sure of its origin. I based the design for our tripod on an apparatus that our colleague John Anderson has in his collection of field equipment. Our only substantial modification to the design was to make the legs of our system separable so that instead of a solid 10′ pipes of aluminium, we have two 5′ pipes, joined by a coupler. This is quite useful for us, since we send our system to China each year, and it makes it much easier to handle for shipping.

I recently made some engineering drawings of our system for a colleague and figured I would share them here in case they may be helpful to others. You can find the plans as a .pdf file here, or explore the system in three dimensions in the software they were designed in (OnShape CAD) at this link.

example drawing: head assembly top plate

Rice crew Vibracoring the Yellow River delta

In the future, I hope that my colleague Brandee Carlson (who leads the research using the Vibracore) and I can write a bit of an updated guide to the system based on our experiences using the system in the field, but for now I’ll just leave you with a few references for the system design below.

Land-based Vibracoring and Vibracore analysis: Tips, Tricks, and Traps. Occasional Paper 58. Thompson, T. A., Miller, C. S., Doss, P. K., Thompson, L. D. P., and Baedke. 1991.

Collection and analysis techniques for paleoecological studies in coastal-deltaic settings — Robert A. Gastaldo

Building a simple delta numerical model: Part VI

This will be the final piece of the model that we need to get to have a working code for delta growth: the time routine. We will define a few more terms in order to set up the model to be able to loop through all the time steps and update the evolving delta.

T = 500; % yrs
timestep = 0.1; % timestep, fraction of years
t = T/timestep; % number of timesteps
dtsec = 31557600 * timestep; % seconds in a timestep

T is the total time the model will be run for (in years), timestep is the fraction of year that will be simulated with each timestep, expressed in seconds as dtsec, and t is the number of timesteps to loop through. Now we simply take our block of code that we’ve built up to calculate all the propertyies of the delta (slope, sediment transport, deposition, etc.) and surround it with a for statement:

for i = 1:t
[S] = get_slope(eta, nx, dx); % bed slope at each node
[H] = get_backwater_fixed(eta, S, H0, Cf, qw, nx, dx); % flow depth
U = Qw ./ (H .* B0); % velocity
[qs] = get_transport(U, Cf, d50, Beta);
qsu = qs(1); % fixed equilibrium at upstream
[dqsdx] = get_dqsdx(qs, qsu, nx, dx, au);
[eta] = update_eta(eta, dqsdx, phi, If, dtsec);
end

To explain in words the above block, now, we are going to go through every timestep i and calculate the slope of the bed (eta) everywhere in the model domain, then we use this slope (and other defined parameters) to determine the flow depth and velocity through the entire delta. The velocity is used to calculate sediment transport, and the change in sediment transport over space produces a change in the channel bed elevation over time (i.e., the Exner equation). Finally, we return to the top of the loop to calculate a new slope based on our new bed.

That’s it! Our delta model is now complete and we can outfit it with all sorts of bells and whistles to test hypotheses about delta evolution in the natural (or experimental) world. A powerful tool indeed!

Below is a simple movie output from this model that shows the results of our hard work! The complete code for the delta model can be found here.

Note that there is a small instability that grows at the front of the sediment wedge, this isn’t a huge problem depending on what you want to do with your model, but you can tweak dx and dt to make things run “smoother” (see the CFL number for more information).

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No.145068 and NSF EAR-1427177. Any opinion, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.